Wednesday, June 28, 2006

CAT FIGHT WOUNDS


CAT FIGHT WOUNDS


Cat fights, this is another question that is commonly asked about fighting cats from owners. There pet was in a cat fight and has come back into the house with some blood on their face or body, but still look okay, the likely result from a fight.

Cat bite wounds can be very deceiving. What only looks like a small wound can have very serious consequences. These wounds frequently result in infections and can be quite debilitating. Bite wounds are more common in male cats versus female cats because they are more territorial.

I don’t see any bite marks?

Cat bite marks are very small, and to see them it is necessary to separate the hair to see the wounds. Often times you won’t see them just by glancing at your cat. Be sure to look where bite wounds happen most frequently, the face and near the base of the tail.


Why can cat bites be so severe?

Like all animals, the mouths of cats are filled with bacteria. When a cat bites, only a few, very small puncture wounds are made. The bacteria go deep into the skin, and are able to grow, and cause a deep infection. Normally when you have a larger wound, like inflicted by a dog bite, the wound is open enough for the bacteria, and pus to drain from the infection.

But with cat bites, only small pucture wounds are left which is not large enough for bacteria, and pus to leak from, so a severe infection and abscess can form.

Monday, June 26, 2006

CAT FIGHT


CAT FIGHT

Cat Fight. Learn how to identify and to differentiate between cat play and cat fights. Discover the best ways to avoid and stop cat fights with the following simple yet effective tips.

If you have a multi cat household or your outdoor cats hang out with other cats, chances are you will encounter cat play. Cat play usually involves chasing, swatting, hissing and nipping.
To a human though, cat play can often look rough, so how can you tell the difference?First off if you know that the two cats in question have never been friendly to each other then chances are what you are witnessing is fighting.

If you are unsure if the cats are playing or fighting rely on your ears and eyes.Cat fighting is something that should be stopped through distraction, since it can lead to disease transmission and/or wounds and wound infections. Screaming is a sure sign that the cats are fighting. One cat being overly dominant is another sign of fighting, usually in cat play the roles shift.Hissing a few times from either cat is normal but continued hissing suggests a cat fight is underway or about to get underway.

Finally and perhaps most importantly in cat play, except for accidents, neither of the two cats gets hurt.The best way to separate fighting cats is through distraction. Making a loud noise or drop something heavy on the floor. That will usually startle the cats and send them running in opposite directions.
Shaking a can of food treats (if they are used to that sound) is another great distraction that will stop the fighting.

Remember cat play like any type of animal play is normal and you shouldn't get involved.Cat fighting is also fairly common but due to the potential that your cat may get harmed or injured, you should try to stop it through distraction.

Do not actually try to physically remove one cat from another or you too may get harmed.